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Women's Health


Here are some arthritis statistics

While evidence of primary ankle osteoarthritis has been discovered in dinosaurs, the first known traces of human arthritis date back as far as 4500 BC. Arthritis is a wide-spread problem throughout the world, with many people experiencing some form of the disease. With over 200 forms of arthritis officially recognized, itís important to know all that you can about the disease. To that end, weíve created this article to give you a better idea of the hard numbers behind arthritic conditions.

- The Center of Disease Control in the United States has reported that arthritic conditions are the leading reason behind disability. A research study conducted by the institute found that every year in the United States, 9,500 people die as a result of arthritis. In addition, 750,000 people are expected to be hospitalized per year, and 8 million people will suffer some physical limitations due to the disease. The scope of the problem is quite wide-spread, with the study also showing that 49 million people in America have been clinically diagnosed with some form of arthritis and a whopping 86 billion dollars being spent to curb issues with arthritis.

- Rheumatoid arthritis, which is one of the most harmful forms of the disease, affects roughly 3 million Americans. Coincidentally, rheumatoid arthritis has been found to be present in women two to three times as often as it is diagnosed in men. The average onset age for this disease has been determined to be between ages 30 and 50. Lupus, another form of arthritis, tends to be found in women most often, with a full 9 out of 10 lupus diagnoses occurring in women. In addition, lupus is as much as three times as likely to strike a woman with African American decent as opposed to Caucasian women. Women also face a higher risk of developing fibromyalgia than their male counterparts, with a chance of getting the disease that is about 7 times as likely.

- Women also faced an increased risk of getting ANY type of arthritis. According to a study conducted in Wisconsin, approximately 30 percent of all women have arthritis, as opposed to 23 percent of all men.

- Those that are obese may face a significantly higher risk of developing arthritis. Approximately 40 percent of all arthritic patients are obese.

- One study places the risk of getting arthritis for the average person in the United States to be about 13.60%. This means that approximately 1 in 7 people in the United States will be diagnosed with arthritis at some point in their lives.

While these statistics may provide some information about how prevalent arthritis is in our society, itís important to closely examine the sources for the studies. The data that was used in this article comes as a result of studies conducted by the Center of Disease Control, the state of Wisconsin, and the National Center for Health Statistics. When viewing the statistics, itís important to consider how the testing process may weigh into the results. Always be sure to take any statistics with a grain of salt, as they may have some margin of error that may skew the results.

 

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Arthritis is a wide-spread problem throughout the world, with many people experiencing some form of the disease. With over 200 forms of arthritis officially recognized, itís important to know all that you can about the disease. To that end, weíve created this article to give you a better idea of the hard numbers behind arthritic conditions.

- The Center of Disease Control in the United States has reported that arthritic conditions are the leading reason behind disability. A research study conducted by the institute found that every year in the United States, 9,500 people die as a result of arthritis. In addition, 750,000 people are expected to be hospitalized per year, and 8 million people will suffer some physical limitations due to the disease. The scope of the problem is quite wide-spread, with the study also showing that 49 million people in America have been clinically diagnosed with some form of arthritis and a whopping 86 billion dollars being spent to curb issues with arthritis.
- Rheumatoid arthritis, which is one of the most harmful forms of the disease, affects roughly 3 million Americans. Coincidentally, rheumatoid arthritis has been found to be present in women two to three times as often as it is diagnosed in men. The average onset age for this disease has been determined to be between ages 30 and 50. Lupus, another form of arthritis, tends to be found in women most often, with a full 9 out of 10 lupus diagnoses occurring in women. In addition, lupus is as much as three times as likely to strike a woman with African American decent as opposed to Caucasian women. Women also face a higher risk of developing fibromyalgia than their male counterparts, with a chance of getting the disease that is about 7 times as likely.
- Women also faced an increased risk of getting ANY type of arthritis. According to a study conducted in Wisconsin, approximately 30 percent of all women have arthritis, as opposed to 23 percent of all men.
- Those that are obese may face a significantly higher risk of developing arthritis. Approximately 40 percent of all arthritic patients are obese.
- One study places the risk of getting arthritis for the average person in the United States to be about 13.60%. This means that approximately 1 in 7 people in the United States will be diagnosed with arthritis at some point in their lives.

While these statistics may provide some information about how prevalent arthritis is in our society, itís important to closely examine the sources for the studies. The data that was used in this article comes as a result of studies conducted by the Center of Disease Control, the state of Wisconsin, and the National Center for Health Statistics. When viewing the statistics, itís important to consider how the testing process may weigh into the results. Always be sure to take any statistics with a grain of salt, as they may have some margin of error that may skew the results.

When you first hear the word arthritis, you probably associate it with little old ladies and old men swaying to and fro in their rocking chairs in their retirement. That is certainly a misconception. While most assuredly it's a degenerative disease, which means it's associated with the aging process, arthritis is not limited to the elderly.

Approximately 70 million Americans suffer from some form of arthritis, according to the Centers for Disease Control. And while arthritis strikes three out of five people aged 65 and older, you'd be amazed at the number of younger people who show signs of this disease. Arthritis affects more than two out of every five individuals between the ages of 45 to 64. And of those between the ages of 18 to 44, one out of every five people suffers with arthritis. More amazing than that, nearly 300,000 children have some form of this disease as well. 

In fact, that's only the first of many misconceptions about arthritis. The next is that many of us think of it as the result of the normal wear and tear of our joints. And that's true Ė as far as that description goes. But arthritis goes so much further than that. 

When we talk of arthritis, most often we're referring to osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease most notably distinguished by the slow breaking down of the joint cartilage. While this disorder can affect any joint in your body, it most often affects fingers, hips, and knees. Initially, you may only notice that one joint is affected. Eventually, though, you'll discover that other joints in the area will be affected as well. 

But, arthritis is really a collection of nearly 100 different forms of osteoarthritis that include a multitude of different diseases from gout and rheumatoid arthritis to fibromyalgia, scleroderma and bursitis. 

Arthritis develops slowly. Many people don't experience any symptoms or signs during the development. Arthritis also strikes people a lot younger than they believe it should. Partly, this is caused by a changing life style. Damage to a joint when you're younger can cause arthritis later in life. That's why football players and others who have had bruises and broken bones are at greater risk.

You may be developing arthritis if you experience joint pain either during or after using it or after a period of inactivity. Additionally, swelling or stiffness in a joint may be an indication that the cartilage may be eroding. If you're losing flexibility in your joints, that too, could be signal of a developing arthritis condition. Visible bony lumps on the middle or end joints of your fingers or at the base of your thumb may also be an indication of arthritis.

Some people claim that they can tell when the weather changes by the aches and pains in their bones. This is one statement about arthritis that is absolutely true. 

Another characteristic of arthritis is that in its first year or so of appearing it strikes with a sharp almost knife-like pain. However, the intensity of this pain eventually subsides, changing into a more dull-like pain. However, if you injure or overuse the affected joint, you'll notice that sharp pain returns.

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