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Endometriosis: The Basics

 

You've learned to live with the pain during sexual intercourse, the severe menstrual cramps, even the pelvic 

pain.  Sometimes, it even hurts when you have your bowel movements.

If your personal health care practitioner has dismissed these signals and told you there's nothing physically wrong with you, don't accept this diagnosis.  Not yet, at least.

Because these are the classic symptoms of endometriosis, the term used to describe the over growth of tissues on the lining of the uterus.  This growth of endometrial tissue to areas such as the abdominal cavity, the ovaries, fallopian tubes as well as the outer surface of such areas as the uterus, and bowels.

The areas of overgrowth are called implants or lesions.  They cause problems for a variety of reasons. It's not unusual for these lesions to bleed during menstruation. These lesions are also the cause of the pain you feel in different parts of your body.  The lesions develop scar tissue or adhesions which can impede an organ's healthy, normal functioning.  And it's this scar tissue that can cause pain and many times make it difficult for a woman to become pregnant.

In fact, the inability to get pregnant is the only symptom some women develop that indicates they may even have endometriosis.  They feel no pain either during intercourse or at other times. And they have no other problems.  Statistics show that between 20 and 40 percent of all infertile females are incapable of conceiving because of this disorder.

But the symptoms mentioned earlier aren't the only ones that could indicate a diagnosis of endometriosis.  Some women who experience various abnormal bleeding are really displaying symptoms of endometriosis.  These signs may include blood in the urine or in the stool, as well as vaginal bleeding before the start of the menstrual period.  Very often this is ignored by women who just chalk it up to "premenstrual spotting".   Additionally, you may have endometriosis if you experience vaginal bleeding following intercourse.

Contrary to some thinking, there really is no correlation between the size of the lesions and the intensity of the pain. Some women simply assume that since they experience a great deal of pain that they possess large endometrial growths.  But that's not necessarily so.  The pain, as well as the bleeding, are more closely associated with the location of the growth and how deeply it has embedded itself in the organ or area of the body rather than the size of the adhesion.

Causes of Endometriosis

Medical science isn't quite sure what exactly causes endometriosis.  However, they have developed several viable theories. 

 

The first is that the individual's immune system may be impaired which leads to this problem.  Some medical experts believe that all women have these growths on the outside of the uterus, but a healthy immune system keeps them in check.  For those who suffer with endometriosis the immune system just isn't doing its job.

 

Another theory is that the menstrual blood, which naturally carries the endometrial cells, is carried up through to the fallopian tubes and into the abdomen.  While this happens in most women, it could be bad enough for those women who experience heavy menstrual bleeding that it causes pain.  It also could be more severe for those who were born with an irregular uterus structure or even with irregularities in the cervix or vagina that blocks or even slows the menstrual flow.  This severity could cause the symptoms of endometriosis.

 

But wait, there are still several others.  One of them is that the endometrial cells are carried to other locations in the body through the lymph system.

 

Other experts see endometriosis as a health condition that is congenital.  They believe that these cells very well may have been deposited outside of the uterus even before the birth of the child.  They just don't cause any problems until a woman reaches her childbearing years.

 

Whatever the cause, endometriosis is a chronic disease.  Every month, the lesions go through the exact same cycle with every menstrual cycle.  The cells grow, they break down and then they bleed.  That's why this pain may start as just a mild discomfort a few days prior to your period, and then ease by the end of your period.

 

Depending on where these lesions are located, though, the pain can be more intense and interrupt not only sexual intercourse, but in some cases actually hurts when a woman attempts to exercise.

 

The symptoms of endometriosis are definitely tied to the menstrual cycle.  Many women discover the signals subside while they are pregnant and complete disappear with the onset of menopause.  Both of these times are characterized by low estrogen levels which slow or even stop the endometriosis growth.  Similarly, women say that their symptoms improve when they are given hormonal treatments that lower their estrogen levels. 

 

For the most part, endometriosis causes no further problems than pain for many women.  However, science has discovered that those who have this disorder seem to be at a higher risk of developing ovarian cancer after they reach the age of 60.

 

Source: http://women.webmd.com/Endometriosis/
Endometriosis-Cause 

Clomid and Endometriosis

There has been concern shown by many people about the effect of taking Clomid and endometriosis. You are advised to speak to a doctor about this possibility and the latest findings.


Note: Some statements in this article may not be approved by the FDA. This article is for informational purposes only and should not be taken as professional medical advice.

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